May
25
8:00 PM20:00

WDVX presents Irene Kelley cd-release show

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WDVX presents 
Irene Kelley's CD Release Show

Saturday, May 25th
All Ages | 8pm

Irene Kelley’s love for country music runs deep. She remembers hearing it for the first time in her dad’s basement TV repair workshop as a young girl. That music in her family home resonated in her soul, so when Irene started writing songs on her own, she already had a head start. At 15, she began her journey as a professional musician in a rock band, but when she brought a Dolly Parton album to band rehearsal one day, she was fired on the spot. It was, perhaps, the best thing that could have happened to her. Fast forward to 1981 when Jerry Williamson asked her to move to Huntington, West Virginia to join the bluegrass band Redwing. She found herself fronting the band as the lead singer and playing some pretty big festivals, not the least of which were Bill Monroe’s Bean Blossom and Tarheal Festivals and the Carter Family Homeplace in Bristol, Virginia. 

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May
28
8:00 PM20:00

Christone "Kingfish" Ingram

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Christone "KINGFISH" Ingram

Tuesday, May 28th
All Ages | $25

Is Christone "Kingfish" Ingram the future of the blues? The blues savior is one of the most exciting young guitarists in years, with a sound that encompasses B.B. King, Jimi Hendrix and Prince." - ROLLING STONE

"A rising blues prodigy... A torchbearer." - NPR MUSIC

"Kingfish is the next explosion of the blues." - BUDDY GUY

Once a generation, a blues artist comes along who not only reminds mainstream audiences how deeply satisfying and emotionally moving the best blues music can be, but shakes the genre to its core. With both eyes on the future and the blues in his blood, 20-year-old guitarist, vocalist and songwriter Christone "King sh" Ingram is set to take the music world by storm with the long-awaited release of his debut album, KINGFISH, on Alligator Records. Sprung from the same earth as so many of the Delta blues masters, King sh comes bursting out of Clarksdale, Mississippi, just ten miles from the legendary crossroads of Highways 61 and 49. A student of the Delta's musical history, he is acutely aware of the musicians and the music that emerged from his corner of the world. "I do think I have an old soul, that I've been here before," he says. "I'm moving forward with one foot in the past."

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May
29
8:00 PM20:00

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

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The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

Wednesday, May 29th
All Ages | 8pm
$20 ADVANCED
$25 Day of Show

***Tickets on Sale Friday 3/15 at 10am***

Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band has built its reputation the long, slow, hard way. After 12 years of playing as many as 300 shows each year, Rev. Peyton, the world’s foremost country blues finger-style picker, along with the biggest little band in the country has pieced together one of the most dedicated followings out there. This following is sure to eat up the band’s latest offering, Poor Until Payday, (the second on their own Family Owned Records label through hip Nashville indie Thirty Tigers) out October 5th, a country blues record that was made the right way — two feet on the ground and both hands getting dirty.

With all the power of a freight train, the Big Damn Band is known for its live shows. Rev. Peyton delivers guitar pyrotechnics the old fashioned way — ten fingers, a 6 string and an amp cranked at full tilt. In the country blues style, he plays the bass with his thumb, while picking the lead with his fingers at the same time. When he lifts the guitar behind his head to play there’s nothing but skill and 16 gauge nickel strings to make the sounds coming out of the speakers.

Beside him on stage are just two other people. His wife, “Washboard” Breezy Peyton playing with all the nuance and percussive power of a New Orleans drum line, and keeping the train moving is Max Senteney on a lean drum kit including a 5 gallon maple syrup bucket. Together they play Peyton’s wildman country blues that’s as much ZZ Top as it is Bukka White.

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May
30
8:00 PM20:00

WDVX presents Blue Moon Rising w/ Buffalo Fiasco

WDVX presents Blue Moon Rising
w/ Buffalo Fiasco

Thursday, May 30th
All Ages | 8pm
$15 General Admission
$25 Premier Reserve Seating
$40 2 Reserve Seats & Table
$80 4 Reserve Seats & Table

Blue Moon Rising is a bluegrass band from East Tennessee that was founded in November 2000 by Tim Tipton, Justin Moses, Chris West, and Keith Garrett. These four founding members had a few simple goals – they wanted to write and record some original bluegrass songs and maybe play some local festivals. Fast forward almost 20 years later, and Blue Moon Rising has become a staple in the world of bluegrass. Their songs have garnered attention from fans all over the world and have appeared on charts from Billboard, Bluegrass Today, Bluegrass Unlimited, and Roots Music Report. The “little-band-that-could” that started out with meager goals has now played hundreds of dates all across the United States and Canada.

The band has had a few personnel changes over the years, as most bands do if they last over a couple of decades, but the core focus of the band has never been altered. The current lineup of the band is a mix of old and new members, a group of friends that would be as comfortable getting together for an evening jam as they would be embarking on a national tour. Three of the original members, Tim Tipton, Keith Garrett, and Chris West, are part of the current band, as are three guys who have decades of the combined membership of Blue Moon Rising: Randall Massengill, Justin Jenkins, and Brandon Bostic.

“After All This Time” is an appropriate title for the band’s current project, which is set for release on Mountain Fever Records later this spring. Fans old and new are likely to be impressed with this effort, for it is Blue Moon Rising at its finest. They are still writing and recording great bluegrass songs, but now with a flare and focus that only comes with the years of experience and the friendship that these guys share.


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May
31
8:00 PM20:00

Crobot

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Filthy Nasty Productions presents
Crobot

Friday, May 31st
All Ages | 7pm Doors | 7:30 Start
$10 Early Bird
$20 ADVANCED

There was a time when rock radio was dominated by great riffs. From Deep Purple’s “Smoke On the Water” and Derek And The Dominoes’ “Layla” to Soundgarden’s “Black Hole Sun” and Rage Against The Machine’s “Killing In The Name Of” it was all about that unmistakable guitar sound that instantly identified a band or song. The members of Crobot have united to bring that back.

Blending funk, blues, metal and good old-fashioned rock and roll into a howling vortex of Yeagley’s vocals and Bishop’s guitar, Crobot have crafted an album of endless good time rock hooks that sound as inspired today as they would have on AOR radio in 1974.

“We grew up with the same riff rock and it’s seemingly lacking in today’s music. We really seem to like the rock of old and felt that was missing,” Yeagley says.

Crobot is a band that can rock at all tempos. Whether it’s the slow-building groove of “Skull Of Geronimo,” a methodical sludge-rocker that calls to mind Soundgarden in the chorus or the more up-tempo funkified “Nowhere To Hide,” a track that sounds like the Black Crowes driving a Camaro, Crobot display stellar musicianship and lyrical depth.

For example, on “Queen Of The Light,” the powerful closing track of Something Supernatural, Yeagley sings the story of a girl yearning for a new life. “She lives the darkest life/but all she wants to be is the queen of the light,” he sings against the plaintive wailing of the slow-moving melody. It’s one of the songs destined to strike a deep chord with fans in the same way the single “Nowhere To Hide” has become a good-time anthem.

“Nowhere To Hide” is one of the songs Yeagley cites as getting his feet wiggling. And he promises that on Something Supernatural there will be plenty more grooves to get fans moving, as those who’ve experienced Crobot live have already seen.

“’Night Of The Sacrifice’ is one that’s coming out off the full length and that always gets me excited to play,” he says. “It’s usually the introduction to the funkier side of what we do in our set, it’s usually the first funky track that we play. So it’s really exciting to switch that mode from more riff based stuff towards to the classic metal sounding stuff with the heavier side of things and to flip flop and see people’s reactions when we totally hit the other end of the spectrum with the funky stuff.”

Musically, “Skull Of Geronimo” is one Yeagley sees as being undeniably representative of Crobot. “That’s a little on the heavier end of the spectrum, but it’s still got that funkiness to it,” he says. And lyrically, “Wizards” might be the Crobot statement song.

“It’s an epic tale of two wizards. One is on the side of wizardry and technology while the other is the side of natural spiritual wizardry and it’s a clash of funkiness and classic metal too in the same sense. So it’s a battle of epic proportions on all sides,” he says. “It’s just a song that fulfills all the ends of the spectrum of what Crobot is.”

Then there is the storytelling ability they show on a song like “La Mano De Lucifer,” a Biblical tale that starts off, “A failed rebellion/against the one creator/exiled to the fire.”

As another side of the band, Yeagley is a devout sci-fi buff. Asked what one film Crobot does the score for, he replies without hesitation, “2001: A Space Odyssey. That movie has its own special place amongst the sci-fi world.” And for contemporary sci-fi he picks Ender’s Game. “I’m such a huge fan of that series and to see that come to life on film was really cool. It’s got battles of epic proportions and everything you love about sci-fi, just nails it,” he says.

A modern rock band with a sense of humor, as well as their own hot sauce, CROBOT has already been making their mark among peers with their wild live performances. But for Crobot, at the end of the day, it is all about the sound.

“All I care about is that people walk away after hearing the album thinking, ‘Man, Crobot is the funkiest, heaviest band I’ve ever heard,’” Bishop says.

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Jun
1
8:00 PM20:00

Matthew Perryman Jones

Matthew Perryman Jones

w/ Leah Blevins


Saturday, June 1
All Ages | 8pm
$20 General Admission 
$25 Premium Reserved
$50 Premium Table for 2
$100 Premium Table for 4

A performing songwriter by trade, Matthew Perryman Jones is actually a seeker, at heart. With each entry in his discography, his musical and moral compass points toward an artistic horizon he has yet to explore. Sometimes, he turns his gaze to examine his own inner world. Other times, he looks to the inspirations found in the letters Vincent Van Gogh penned to his brother Theo, in the idea of duende as proffered by Federico García Lorca, and in the poetic verses of Sufi poets Hafiz and Rumi.

Of his most recent release, American Songwriter wrote that, “MPJ’s songwriting acumen could easily be used as a musical template to demonstrate how less can be so much more. [He]sounds cinematic and slowly worms its way inside your brain, feasts upon your emotions, and ultimately burrows down into your soul.” It could be said that Matthew makes soul music — not based on how it sounds, but on where it originates and where it resides.

Originally from Pennsylvania, Matthew grew up in Georgia and cut his artistic teeth in the Atlanta music scene before heading north to Nashville. His debut release, Nowhere Else But Here, dropped in 2000, followed by three subsequent albums — Throwing Punches in the Dark (2006), Swallow the Sea (2008), and Land of the Living (2012) — and three additional EPs as well as a handful of singles. Songs from across his catalog have been featured in dozens of film and TV placements, and tours have taken him across the U.S. and abroad to share stages with legends like Shawn Colvin and Patty Griffin, as well as the Ten Out of Tenn songwriter collective of which he is a part.

Now, Matthew is gearing up to release his fifth album, alongside producer Josh Kaler, focused on genius loci — the spirit of place. Written across the country throughout 2017, and funded by generous fans contributing to a Pledge Music campaign, the record was finished in early 2018. As he chases the ever-retreating horizon, Jones will stop, listen, and capture when and what the spirit of each place calls out to him.

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Jun
5
8:00 PM20:00

Gretchen Peters w/ Trisha Gene Brady

Gretchen Peters with special guest
Trisha Gene Brady

Wednesday, June 5th
All Ages | 8pm
$15 General Admission 
$20 Premier Reserve Seating
$40 2 Reserve Seats & Table
$80 4 Reserve Seats & Table

There's a bittersweet beauty to the passing of time -- the changes it brings are just as often heartbreaking as they are heartwarming. The inevitable tension that arises from that sway is Gretchen Peters' most trusted muse. “The years go by like days. Sometimes the days go by like years. And I don't know which one I hate the most,” she sings in “Arguing with Ghosts,” the hauntingly wistful opening cut on her new album, Dancing with the Beast. 

Between the melody and the melancholy, the song sets the tone for all that is to come after and lifts the album over the high artistic bar set by her last outing, 2015's award-winning Blackbirds. Written with Matraca Berg and Ben Glover, “Arguing with Ghosts” began, as so many songs do, with one small grain of inspiration. “I think we were initially talking about how Nashville is changing, and Matraca said, 'I get lost in my hometown,'” Peters recalls. “And we went from there. Of course, it took on much more meaning, but I think that our starting point was just that sense of disorientation.” 

Whether a single sentence or a simple setting, once planted, even the tiniest seed can grow into a vision unto itself. Strung together and populated with strong and broken female heroines, those vignettes make up Dancing with the Beast and, indeed, Peters' entire discography. “The pictures and the details come first, and I think that's kind of necessary because they're sort of like little bombs of emotion,” she says. “It's like when you pull out a Polaroid that you haven't seen in 25 years, and your heart just kind of explodes because it brings back a whole world.”

Once immersed in a world of emotion, Peters digs underneath to see what's fueling a particular fire, as she does so stunningly with the overwhelming insecurities of female adolescence in “The Boy from Rye.” Knowing very well that most teenage girls endure objectification and sexualization, and their ensuing loss of confidence and power, Peters put her pen to paper and told that story.

"I remember being that age -- summers on Long Island at the beach, the sense of freedom, being with friends, encounters with boys, and the pressure of suddenly being in competition with your best friends.” she offers. “There was a feeling that you’d crossed some invisible line, and gone from being the subject in your own life, to being the object. It's a very treacherous time of life for girls.”

Dancing with the Beast puts female characters at the fore, from teenage girls to old women. And intentionally so. With the 2017 Women's March and #MeToo Movement as bookends to her writing time, Peters knew that a feminist perspective would be the critical core of the record. “Those two events just put everything -- as so many things in 2017 -- in really stark relief,” she admits. “You can trace the feminist DNA in my songwriting back to 'Independence Day' and probably before. The thing that 2017 did is just put it front and center. It was very easy to kind of go to sleep for a while and just not think about that stuff because we were lulled into complacency for eight years.” 

Scenery, too, played a part in inspiring several cuts on the LP, most notably “Wichita” and “Truckstop Angel,” both sketches of women doing whatever they have to do to stand up in a world built to hold them down. Once she knew where the songs were set, Peters and Glover dug into the details. “'Wichita' was a lot like 'Blackbirds,' with me and Ben playing detective, like, 'What do you think happened here?'” she says. “I think I had the line, ’I hope I was the last thing that you saw that night in Wichita.' And the next questions were, ‘What happened to this girl? How did we get there?'”

“Truckstop Angel” was an idea originally sparked 20-something years ago by a New Yorker article Peters read about people that lived in the wide open western reaches. “They just kind of went out there to get away from the world,” she explains. “I read this article and I was fascinated, and one of the things in the article was these truckstop prostitutes. And I just never got that out of my mind.” Peters wrote around the idea a lot in those two decades, but never got to the heart of the story until she encountered such a character at a truckstop in Alabama. “This woman -- a girl, really, as I don't think she was more than 17 -- at 1:30 in the afternoon, walks through the lot in five-inch platform shoes and short shorts. And I just thought, 'Oh my God, that's the woman. That's her.'”

A title -- and an election -- were the beginnings of “Lowlands.” Though Peters doesn't consider herself a political writer, she is politically minded and, therefore, knew she had to address the 2016 election and all that has happened since... but in her own way. “I wrote on my chalkboard, 'Tell one little story,'” she says. “I just wrote it there, and I would stare at it for a while.” 

Soon enough, the title came, bringing with it both a feeling and a place. “The description of the geography gave me a feeling inside of low clouds and general gloominess, but also the idea of laying low and staying low.” To capture that mood, Peters crafted a multitude of verses, whittled them down, and stitched them together. “It has no chorus. It's nothing but verses. It's very Dylan-esque, in that way,” she says. “I just wanted it to drone on and on. We don't get a break. It's relentless, which is exactly how last year was.”

To further drive the relentlessness, producer Doug Lancio built a foundation of programmed drums and synth drones, elements that purposely pushed Peters to the outer edges of her artistic comfort zone. “We struggled together over how far to go with that kind of thing,” she confesses. “I wanted 'Lowlands' to sound like the sound of dread. But the first mix we had going just didn't feel like me. It had to have some beauty in there, too.” 

The final female voice on the album comes from Peters' mother, who passed away in late 2016. “Love That Makes a Cup of Tea” came out of a dream Peters had of her. “I can't remember what the rest of the dream was, but she, in a reassuring way, held my hand and she said, 'You know, honey, there is love that makes a cup of tea,'” Peters recounts. “She was the kind of person who would show you her love by baking you a pie or knitting you a sweater. She just said that in the dream, and I woke up and I thought, 'Okay, there it is. I'm going to write that.' 

“I do remember feeling that I had to try to write something with hope in it,” she continues. “It's not my strong suit. But I wanted that on this record, because I do think there's hope. I do see hope around me. I see a lot of trouble, too, but we have to try to find some light. Those are hard songs for me to write, but this was my mom's gift. She brought that to me.”

Beauty tempered by dread, sorrow buoyed by hope, these are the ever-present tugs of war that make life worth living and songs worth writing. And they are the over-riding themes that make Gretchen Peters one of her generation's most compelling singer/songwriters.

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Jun
6
8:00 PM20:00

Lucette with Special Guest Vanessa Peters

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Lucette

Vanessa Peters

Thursday, June 6th
All Ages | 8pm
$12 ADVANCED
$15 Day of Show

On her sophomore album Deluxe Hotel Room, indie-pop artist Lucette turns her title phrase into a metaphor for experiences both highly specific and widely familiar: fleeting romance, emotional displacement, isolation, the gulf between the presumed glamour of the artist's life and the reality of getting by.

Produced by Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter Sturgill Simpson at The Butcher Shoppe in Nashville, Deluxe Hotel Room unfolds in endlessly contrasting layers of feeling. "A lot of joy and a lot of pain has happened for me in hotel rooms," says the Canadian artist otherwise known as Lauren Gillis. "I've stayed in hotel rooms I'd never be able to afford myself and, unfortunately, I've been put in extremely uncomfortable situations in hotel rooms. Also, hearing about a lot of the pain women in the entertainment industry have been through in hotel rooms urged me to write the title track to this album."

In keeping with a refusal to self-restrain, Lucette assembled a purposely iconoclastic sonic palette for the album. "A lot of the songs are very traditional in their roots, but Sturgill and I had this idea of producing them in a more pop-leaning way," says Lucette, who grew up on ABBA and names Rihanna among her main inspirations. "There's only one or two guitar tracks on the whole record, and instead of putting banjos or pedal steel all over the place, we did it up in a way that felt a lot more genuine to my upbringing and character."

Born and based in Edmonton, Alberta, Lucette first began exploring her singular narrative voice as a teenager, drawing inspiration from artists as eclectic as Leonard Cohen and Blaze Foley and Amy Winehouse and Etta James. In especially formative moments, records like Joni Mitchell's Blue helped her cope with times of depression and made her appreciate her home, Canada. "At times, away from home, I could barely even get out of bed, and I remember the part in 'River' when she says, 'drew a map of Canada' and 'I wish I had a river to skate away on,'" Lucette recalls. "Those lyrics broke me but, made me appreciate my home." At age 19, Lauren made her debut as Lucette with Black Is the Color, a Dave Cobb-produced 2014 release featuring the acclaimed single "Bobby Reid." In addition to appearing in the "Bobby Reid" video, Simpson enlisted Lucette as the opening act on a 2014 tour in support of his album Metamodern Sounds in Country Music, bringing her captivating live set to venues across the country.

Backed by Simpson's touring band, Lucette embeds Deluxe Hotel Room with so many unexpected flourishes: brooding drum-machine beats, luminous synth lines, and -- perhaps most strikingly -- the soulful saxophone work of New Orleans musician Brad Walker. Along with shining a new light on her gracefully sculpted melodies, the album finds Lucette bringing a previously unglimpsed boldness to her vocal presence. "The only direction Sturgill really gave me with the vocals was, 'Sing it like you mean it,'" says Lucette. "Because of that, I think you can actually hear what my voice sounds like for the very first time."

After opening with the piano-led reflection of its title track, Deluxe Hotel Room drifts into the torchy intensity of "Out of the Rain" -- a song about the breakup that informed much of the album. "'Out of the Rain' came from experiencing freedom from such a negative relationship, and then having that feeling of freedom wear off while I was out on tour," Lucette explains. "It was bittersweet because I was doing exactly what I wanted to be doing, but I just felt alone and vulnerable and sort of bluesy about the whole situation." Threaded with fragile synth tones, "Out of the Rain" brilliantly magnifies that lonesome mood with a sublime saxophone solo from Walker ("Every time I hear that solo, it hurts my soul a little bit," Lucette notes).

Although much of Deluxe Hotel Room wanders into heavy-hearted terrain, lead single "Angel" arrives as a heavenly piece of dream-pop driven by pounding piano riffs, bright drumbeats, and swirling, symphonic synth lines. "I was in a relationship that didn't last long, but felt like the first time where a relationship was fun and not work," says Lucette. "I wrote 'Angel' from a place of admiration and joy for being with someone so sweet and full of life."

Throughout Deluxe Hotel Room, Lucette reveals the depth and scope of her songwriting, her ability to capture often-overlooked elements of the human experience. To that end, "Full Moon Town" spins an unsettling portrait of small-town living, while the sleepy, sax-laced "Fly to Heaven" and the shimmering "California" ruminate on escape and the afterlife. On "Crazy Bird," with its hazy textures and gospel harmonies, Lucette examines the uneasy thrill of falling for someone larger-than-life and impossible to pin down. One of the album's most gripping and epic moments, "Talk to Myself" is an intimate meditation on mental health, with Lucette's vocal performance both glorious and devastating in its determination. ("It's about my struggle with feeling sane sometimes, and how -- even when I feel like I'm losing it -- you'll never see me fully lose myself," says Lucette.) And on "Lover Don't Give Up on Me," Deluxe Hotel Room closes out with a stripped-back piano ballad that channels all the quiet grief in longing for a person who's emotionally impenetrable.

In looking back on her path as an artist, Lucette observes a certain shift in her motivation to make music. "When I was a teenager, I mostly wrote songs because I wanted to have my voice heard," she says. "Now it's more cathartic, a way of telling people what my life's been like." But as Deluxe Hotel Room proves, her songwriting goes beyond confession to offer something of greater purpose: a sense of solidarity and solace for those who've endured similar troubles. "To me these songs are a way of getting through to anyone who's had problems with depression or anxiety or issues with their body and, letting them know they're not the only ones who feel lost sometimes," says Lucette. "Making the album helped me realize that my strength doesn't lie in how a partner or the public sees me -- it's about being open about mistakes I've made and things I've been through, and then moving forward with hope."

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Jun
7
8:00 PM20:00

Josh Rouse

Josh Rouse

Friday, June 7th
All Ages | 8pm
$15 General Admission
$20 Premier Reserve Seat
$40 2 Reserve Seats & Table
$80 4 Reserve Seats & Table

Never one to ignore the call of his muse, Rouse traded in his trusty acoustic guitar for a synthesizer, a move that quickly pulled him in a slew of exciting, unexpected directions as he found himself freshly inspired by the endless array of possibilities at his fingertips. Where ‘Embers’ was a deeply personal, countrypolitan contemplation on identity and anxiety, the new material that poured out of him was breezier and more carefree, crafted with an 80’s-inspired sonic palette that complemented the shift from somber introspection to more playful observation. The end result, ‘Love In The Modern Age,’ is an album that still bears Rouse’s distinct fingerprints, even as it pushes his limits and forges a bold new chapter more than twenty years into his celebrated career.

Hailed as “a talent to outrank Ryan Adams or Conor Oberst” by Uncut and praised for his “spare and easy sounding guitar songs” by NPR, Rouse first emerged in 1998 with his debut album, ‘Dressed Up Like Nebraska,’ which Billboard called a “dark horse gem.” Over the next two decades, he’d go on to release a steady stream of critically lauded records that would solidify his status as one of the his generation’s most acclaimed songwriters, both in the US and Europe, where he’s lived on and off since 2004. Q called his breakout album, ‘1972,’ “the most intimate record of the year,” while Rolling Stone dubbed his follow-up, ‘Nashville,’ “a landmark album,” and EW described 2013’s ‘The Happiness Waltz’ as “a big contender for Rouse’s best work.” In 2014, Rouse won a Goya Award (the Spanish equivalent of an Oscar) for best song for “Do You Really Want To Be In Love,” from the film ‘La Gran Familia Española.

As he began work on ‘Love In The Modern Age,’ Rouse was caught in a moment of international limbo. He was ready to relocate from Spain back to Nashville with his family, but his wife’s green card process was stretching out interminably. As they awaited news from the US government, their Tennessee home sat empty for more than a year, and Rouse found himself making regular trips across the Atlantic to check in on the property.

“I started working on songs with my old friend and writing partner Daniel Tashian on those trips,” Rouse explains. “I’d just finished reading Sylvie Simmons’ great Leonard Cohen biography, ‘I’m Your Man,’ and it got me really into Cohen’s synthier records. I told Daniel that I thought it’d be fun to write some stuff in that vein, so we’d start with these moody soundscapes, and then I’d write lyrics on top of them.”

Inspired by Cohen and cult heroes The Blue Nile, as well as the English bands Rouse grew up listening to like The Cure and The Smiths, the songs were cinematic and enveloping. Each track created its own entrancing world out of dense synthesizer textures and shimmering electric guitar lines. While many of his previous albums were recorded with a full band performing live in one room, Rouse built up the tracks on ‘Love In The Modern Age’ a layer at a time, recording the majority of the instruments himself between Spain and Nashville.

in me that wouldn’t have happened with just an acoustic guitar.”

Much like love in our modern age, the album is defined by the coming together of those physical and digital worlds. Underneath it all, though, lays the same endless search for human connection that drives each and every one of us. Times may change, but the song remains the same.

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Mindy Smith with very special guest, Blue Mother Tupelo
Jun
22
8:00 PM20:00

Mindy Smith with very special guest, Blue Mother Tupelo

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Mindy Smith with special guests

Blue Mother Tupelo

Saturday, June 22nd
All Ages | 8pm | $25

A solo acoustic tour celebrating the 15th anniversary of ‘One Moment More’ through stories and song. 

“Her voice carves melodies so sharp and fine you can almost see them…” – New York Times


“Smith’s best songs sound like little miracles.” – USA Today

A good rule of thumb when going to a Mindy Smith concert, bring a hanky, a tissue or an extra sleeve. Your tear ducts don’t know the difference between laughing tears and crying tears and you’ll likely be doing both. “Humor is how I compensate for singing so many sad tunes back to back,” says Smith.

Mindy Smith is a Long Island-born, Nashville based singer-songwriter with a clear and honest passion for Americana, jazz, pop, rock, blues, and folk and is a self-proclaimed music genre mutt.

She first created a buzz in the music world in 2003 charming fans with her rendition of Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” for the tribute album ‘Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton.’ In 2004, Mindy solidified her place and won critical acclaim with her own debut album, ‘One Moment More’ which was re-issued on vinyl for the first time in 2019, to commemorate its 15th Anniversary.

She has since released four additional full-length studio albums, a Christmas EP, and numerous singles.

Her original songs have been recorded and released by the likes of Alison Krauss, Lee Ann Womack, Faith Hill and many more. Mindy has performed alongside the likes of Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, John Prine, and Mary Chapin Carpenter and was most recently the featured vocalist on Kenny Chesney’s charting single, “Better Boat”.

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Jul
13
8:00 PM20:00

Erin Enderlin

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Erin Enderlin

Saturday July 13
All Ages | 7pm Doors | 8pm Start
$12 Advanced
$15 Day of Show

“One of the best things about country music was that it was adult music,” Erin Enderlin says. “It was real music that dealt with hard issues in life so that people going through those things don’t feel so alone.” 

The observation is signature Enderlin: She has a way of turning a song or even just a thought into an outstretched hand to the lonely or ashamed. While she first turned heads as a godsend to those aching for an artist with some golden-era country backbone, Enderlin’s acclaimed 2017 record Whiskeytown Crier firmly cemented her as something even more: a literary songwriter and superb vocal stylist with a knack for sharply drawn––and often sad––characters. Backsliders, avengers, lovers, and victims––they’re all swapping forlorn tales on the collection, which is a fresh take on the concept album set in a small Southern town.

Now, Enderlin is home in Nashville, stopping to reflect on that record and the past couple of years as she enjoys a little down time after opening a run of shows for Jamey Johnson. 2018 was especially busy: Named a member of the 2018 CMT Next Women of Country class, recipient of the Arkansas Country Music Awards Songwriter and Album of the Year trophies, and runner-up to Jason Isbell in the Best Singer-Songwriter field in the Nashville Scene’s touchstone Best of Nashville issue, Enderlin surged to the top of playlists. Already a go-to writer for stars looking for heavyweight country with classic panache––Alan Jackson’s “Monday Morning Church,” Lee Ann Womack’s “Last Call,” Luke Bryan’s “You Don’t Know Jack,” and a host of other songs for Randy Travis, Joey+Rory, and more are all Enderlin-penned––she added marquee cuts to her catalog: Reba recorded “The Bar’s Getting Lower” for her upcoming album Stronger Than the Truth; Terri Clark featured five Enderlin-written gems on her Raising the Bar album; Whisperin’ Bill Anderson recorded and released her “Waffle House Christmas,” then featured her in the song’s beloved video. After listening to Enderlin perform on the radio broadcast of the Grand Ole Opry while en route there herself, Jeannie Seely decided to sing the song she heard Enderlin deliver, the gut-punching “I Let Her Talk.” This summer, Enderlin is up for six more Arkansas Country Music Awards.

The flurry of activity––especially from classic country giants who are still standing–– thrills Enderlin. “I can’t believe I got that Reba cut––it’s a lifelong dream,” she says. “It’s kind of ridiculous. Sometimes I just think, ‘Are there more five-year-olds thinking, I want to play the Opry and I want Reba to sing my songs!’ And then it happens?” She laughs, still high from the win.

If Enderlin is tired after all the creative hustle, she doesn’t let on. Instead, she sounds energized by her latest project, which she describes as a sort of “evolution” of Whiskeytown Crier. Enderlin plans to release four EPs throughout 2019. In a twist that stretches the possibilities of storytelling through song, each three-track collection will be driven by a single character. “I’m obsessed with characters, and the idea of being able to take that to the next level really appeals to me,” she says. “It’s really ambitious.” She pauses and laughs again before adding, “But I do think it’s going to be something really cool.”

The first EP, Volume 1: Tonight I Don’t Give a Damn, proves “cool” is an understatement. Three songs follow a woman first introduced on “Broken,” a standout Whiskeytown Crier track. “For me, it was really interesting to think about how her situation was going to affect the rest of her life,” Enderlin says. “We may get certain ideas about a character right off the bat, based on a situation they’re in, and then, you’re entrenched. But what made this person that way? What happened to them?”

“Broken” reappears on Volume 1: Tonight I Don’t Give a Damn as the sorrowful anchor. A first-person look at abuse’s lifetime of reverberations, the song introduces a woman living with choices made––both her own and that of those around her. 

Kicking off with pedal steel, “Till It’s Gone” picks back up with “Broken”’s protagonist, this time as she’s haunted by memories in a seedy motel room. The mourning steel serves as a second narrator, crying between Enderlin’s poignant vignettes. “I don’t think you can have too much pedal steel,” she says. “If someone says you can, you probably need to get rid of that person because you don’t need that kind of negativity in your life.”

The EP’s title track finds the woman, who is never named but so intimately known, settling for forbidden companionship and brown liquor in a dive bar. It’s one more example of Enderlin’s stealthy ability to make listeners pity instead of condemn. “I tend to gravitate toward the first person,” she says. “Sometimes there are stories that you can’t do that with, but there is a certain grittiness when you can––when you can take the character on and speak for them.”

The three songs would stand alone as winning modern takes on traditional honky tonk, but together, they create a layered story arc from a woman’s point-of-view that answers some questions even as it leaves listeners with more. The result is a major accomplishment in musicianship, storytelling, and playing around with art’s established paradigms of delivery.

Enderlin is obviously intrigued by new ways of reaching fans’ ears, and the EPs are just one dimension to her approach. She will also offer E-Clips and E-Covers: the first, social-media-ready snippets of songs made famous by others; the second, complete new versions of some of Enderlin’s favorite songs, released on Spotify, Apple Music and other digital platforms. “I’m a huge musicphile,” she says. “What better way is there to get to know an artist than to learn what their influences are and what music they love, too?”

In the end, Enderlin is experimenting with country music’s form while honoring its roots––a rare blend that balances her need to challenge and embrace herself alongside an urge to meet people exactly where they are. “We all live hectic lives, which makes getting these little nuggets-–these songs––great,” she says. “You have extra time and attention for each song. It’s like, okay, this can be your baby today. You can really sink your teeth into this song and figure it out.”

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Aug
1
8:00 PM20:00

Hush Kids

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Hush Kids

Thursday, August 1st
All Ages | 8pm
$15 ADVANCED
$18 Day of Show
 

“We should start a band.”

Jill Andrews is nursing her newborn daughter on the couch in her dear friend and collaborator, Peter Groenwald’s, studio. It is September and still too hot outside. Peter is mixing a song they wrote, one of dozens that came together curiously, almost on its own when they sat down to write it. Peter looks at Jill, six week-old baby on one side of her body and guitar slung and still singing a bit on the other. For Peter, a father himself, the timing is unexpected, but nearly everything about their partnership has been. He plays the song back and listens for a minute.

“Absolutely” he says, “We should start a band”

With a treasury of thoughtful, tenderly written songs at their disposal, they already had.

Hush Kids is a friendship with music. It began long before it had a name, when two beloved Nashville artists with impressive solo careers were put together by their publishers to write songs for other people; in time, they discovered they had been writing for themselves all along. Their earliest sessions revealed more than chemistry, they revealed kindredness, an innate understanding that allowed two very different people to write some of the most deeply personal music of their careers. 

Incredible, instinctive vocal symmetry, captivating melodies, and intimate, intelligent lyrics speak to the years of tireless craftsmanship and well-earned successes by both artists respectively. A gifted composer, producer, and musician Peter has toured extensively and shared the stage with artists such as The Civil Wars, Andrew Belle, and John Mayer. Jill, a founding member of the alt/country favorite The Everybodyfields, has performed alongside The Avett Brothers, Willie Nelson, and Drew Holcomb & the Neighbors and secured television placements that include Greys Anatomy, American Idol, and Nashville.

Hush Kids self-titled debut journeys across the unexpected, the strangeness of love rather than the sweetness, the beauty of the world rather than the bullshit. Guided by writer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist, Ian Fitchuk and joined by some of Nashville’s most sought-after musicians, the record pairs the effortless, addictive pop sensibility of The Carpenters with the dusty, atmospheric, desert landscape of Robert Plant and Allison’s Kraus’s Americana classic, “Raising Sand.”

Despite the name, Hush Kids is not about quiet, it’s about stepping away from the wrong kind of noise to embrace the music.

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Aug
16
8:00 PM20:00

Lilly Hiatt

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Lilly Hiatt

Friday, August 16th
All Ages | 8pm

General Admission $12
Premier Reserve Seating $15
2 Reserve Seats & Table $30
4 Reserve Seats & Table $50


Lilly Hiatt returned with Trinity Lane on August 25th, 2017. The 12-song set was produced by Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope and engineered by Andy Dixon at Trent’s Studio Bees in Johns Island, SC. It is the follow up to her acclaimed sophomore album Royal Blue, which Paste Magazine described as “a glorious tumble of influences – surf rock, Smiths vibes, Laurel Canyon twang and jangle, Sonic Youth flatline, Britpop flourishes, Seattle grunge and Joy Division meets Human League synthery.” In addition to her backing band, Trent is featured as a musician throughout, and is joined by his wife and Shovels & Rope partner Cary Ann Hearst for backing vocals on “Everything I Had.” Lilly’s love of the ‘90s alt-rock she was raised on continues to shine through on Trinity Lane in the distressed guitars and urgent backbeats. She cites the Pixies, Breeders, Dinosaur Jr., and her favorite, Pearl Jam as influences, but there is also something distinctly Americana lurking in the songs. Rolling Stone Country premiered the Michael Carter-directed video for the album’s title track HERE, stating, “The daughter of John Hiatt, she keeps the family tradition alive, mixing Southern influences – Americana, folk and left-of-center country – with a raw approach that’s better suited to the garage than the saloon. The album’s title track is no exception…the song finds Hiatt making peace with her old demons, while guitars crash and pianos chime in the background.” They continued, “‘Trinity Lane’ is an empowerment anthem stocked with details from Hiatt’s everyday life, from the name of her street to the smell of her neighbor’s cooking.”

After moving out of an ex’s house, Hiatt settled into a new apartment off of Trinity Lane in her East Nashville neighborhood and went on tour with friend John Moreland to the West Coast and back. The intensely personal, autobiographical album was written largely upon her return, in isolation, facing the issues she escaped while on the road. Every time she wanted a man, she picked up her guitar. Every time she wanted a drink, she picked up her guitar. Hiatt says, “Love will take you to the darkest places but also the most honest places if you let it. Learning how to love myself is something I’ve always been lousy with, and I spent some time on that. I thought about my sobriety, what that means to me, the struggles I’d had throughout the years, since I was a 27-year-old and hung up my toxic drinking habit. I thought about my mother, who took her own life when I was a baby, not far from my age at 30 years old, and I related to her more than ever. As you can see, there was plenty of time spent on my own. I didn’t talk to that many folks, albeit a few close friends, and leaned into my family. I stayed away from men, and danced alone in the evenings, looking out my window observing my humble and lively neighborhood. I found power in being by myself. I found peace in the people I was surrounded with – we didn’t really know one another, but we smiled when passed on the street. One time I almost rear-ended an older woman in her car backing out of my driveway and I said, ‘Oh man, I’m just not used to any cars coming around this bend. She replied, ‘This is our little hideout, baby,’ And it really was.” She continues, “After a while, I had all these songs to play, and wanted to share them. I wanted to get out of town to get some distance from everything, so after an ongoing conversation with Michael Trent, I took my band to Johns Island, SC and we holed up for a few weeks. I poured my heart out, and trusted them with it, and these guys gave it right back. I think we all understood what it’s like to question home, intention, demons, love…I think most people understand that.”

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Sep
5
8:00 PM20:00

Griffin House

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Griffin House

Thursday, September 5th
All Ages | 8pm
$80 4 PREMIER SEATS & TABLE
$40 2 PREMIER SEATS & TABLE
$20 RESERVE SEATING
$15 GENERAL ADMISSION

It is a true, and nowadays rare, musician who writes lyrics so vulnerable and authentic that an audience is irrevocably captured by the powerful experience of sharing the journey. An album that is essentially an autobiographical account of personal mistakes, change, and growth, offers listeners a chance to reflect on their own experiences and connect with another’s story.

With Griffin House’s upcoming album, So On And So Forth, it is clear the artist digs deep and offers up his narrative after much reflection. House is now a young family man and artist who is choosing sobriety and celebrating the path to his success, through songs which share his perspective on how people remember the past with rose-colored glasses, how we grow up and realize what we deeply need, and how we must find happiness in ourselves in the present.

“The record has a lot to do with recognizing the ego in one’s self and letting it die. It can feel like your whole identity is being wiped away, and you don’t even know who you are anymore. For the person singing these songs, holding on to one’s own individuality in order to remain special or important in the world has started to became far less important than being content with being a good, decent, and loving person. But old habits die hard,” adds House.

The project was tracked last summer at Lakehouse Recording Studios, in Asbury Park, New Jersey. House’s ties to Asbury Park go all the back to 2004, when he was invited to tour with Patti Scialfa. His first show in the boardwalk town was opening a show for Scialfa at the Paramount Theatre. It was there that Griffin met her husband, Bruce Springsteen, and all the wonderful characters in their crew and band. Those memories and experiences made returning to Asbury Park over a decade later to record So On And So Forth feel like a full circle moment in his career.

House recorded the essentially live project with no click track and very little overdubbing. Lakehouse owner, Jon Leidersdorff, helped assemble the band. Prior to walking into the studio, House had never met the musicians and had no idea how the songs would turn out. He adds, “The experience ended up being one of the most fun and positive of my career. The process was stress-free and freeing.” The resulting album reflects this journey -- a leap of faith with triumphant results.

Recording and performing for over a decade, House has toured with Ron Sexsmith, Patti Scialfa, Josh Ritter, John Mellencamp, Mat Kearney, and The Cranberries. He received early critical acclaim on the CBS Sunday Morning, and his songs have since been featured in countless films and television shows such as One Tree Hill, Army Wives, and Brothers and Sisters. He has also appeared on Late Night with Craig Ferguson. Most recently, CNN Newsroom invited House to perform “Paris Calling,” from So On and So Forth, live on the air, and the song has been picked up by radio prior to being serviced. House has released ten albums and continues to headline his own national tours. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee with his wife Jane and their two daughters.

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May
23
8:00 PM20:00

Dylan LeBlanc

Dylan LeBlanc

Thursday, May 23rd
All Ages | 8pm
$10 ADVANCED
$12 Day of Show

 

Dylan LeBlanc knows second chances don’t come around often. But, neither do voices like his.

Overwhelmed by the speed his gift would take him, from Applebee’s server to “the new Neil Young” in a matter of months, he walked away from an unlikely major label deal after releasing two critically acclaimed albums. He slipped into a blur of booze and self-doubt. Exhausted and damaged at just 23-years-old, Dylan came home to Muscle Shoals, Alabama to write a new life for himself.

In between the moments of clarity and a few familiar falls, he also wrote a new album, Cautionary Tale: a collection of shimmering, arresting songs with the same haunting vocals that caught the attention of Lucinda Williams and Bruce Springsteen, now with a sharpened edge honed by hastened maturity.

“This record is about me getting honest with myself,” says Dylan. “I had to let the guilt about the past go and find a new truth within myself. This time, I felt like I really had something to say.”

To help him say it, he sought out long-time friend Ben Tanner, the same guy who had secretly helped Dylan record his first songs after hours while working at fabled FAME Studios. (He also introduced a 16-year-old Dylan to Wilco, George Harrison, and Ryan Adams by way of an external hard drive). In between touring with Alabama Shakes, Ben was beginning to engineer records again at the label he started with another friend of Dylan’s, Grammy Award-winning musician John Paul White, formerly of the Civil Wars. The two both produced and played on Cautionary Tale.

“They prevented me from burying my words,” says Dylan. “Doubt can often be my first instinct, and I’ll try to cover things up with more elements to hide my voice, but I made up my mind to trust them. I heard Merle Haggard say once that the singer is secondary to the song, and they both helped me build a strong foundation for the emotions I was feeling.”

The stripped down aesthetic that John Paul and Ben have made their label’s calling card sets Dylan’s voice in a light bright enough to see the patina the last few years has left behind.

“I spent a lot of time writing about programming and conditioning and the idea of ego,” says Dylan. “I don’t want to rely on my circumstances or the past to say why I am the way I am anymore. A lot of my songs like ‘Cautionary Tale’ and ‘Look How Far We’ve Come’ are about trying to break out of a vicious cycle. I was wondering if I could find my solutions from within—if I could believe in something beyond the present.”

If Dylan was wandering through a cemetery with his first album Paupers Field (“Songs are like headstones to me,” he told The Guardian), Cautionary Tale is an abandoned desert town. He reflects on what once was, and if anything could be again. At times, he wonders if the signs of life he sees on the horizon are real or just a mirage. Phantasmic, warbling voices in the background rise to meet his own and fade into the ether; ghostly guitar riffs echo in the emptiness around him.

Finding the right arrangement and words was a more deliberate effort for Dylan this time. After feeling lost in the “mania” of recording his first two albums, he relied on Ben and John Paul to help him collect the pieces of his vision.

“I’ve definitely become more disciplined. I don’t count on things like inspiration anymore,” says Dylan. “I learned so much from putting songs together with John Paul. Anything he does, it’s always going to be well-thought-out and well-placed. I’m naturally an improv guy, but now I see how that can be more limiting than planning your next move.”

That new-found discipline shows. Never one to write out parts, Dylan methodically scored the stunning string sections with violinist Kimi Samson and cellist Caleb Elliot. To form the polished rhythm section he wanted to drive songs like “The Easy Way Out” and “Beyond the Veil,” he paired drummer Jeremy Gibson with Alabama Shakes bassist Zac Cockrell (“I wanted it to feel like a Bill Withers record or Al Green—soulful, but tight.”)

While Dylan will be the first to admit he wasn’t ready to stand on the stages he played early in his career, there’s no doubting he is now. With a recalibrated compass, he’s back on the road opening sold-out shows for British singer-songwriter George Ezra, another artist praised for a wizened voice beyond his years.

Dylan will continue to support George through September 2015, including a show at Nashville’s legendary Ryman Auditorium. Next, he’ll embark on his solo tour with dates throughout the South, Midwest, and New England.

“After everything I’ve gone through, I still love putting records out and singing for people, no matter how big or small the crowd,” says Dylan. “It’s the only thing I want to do, and now I get to keep doing it as a more well-rounded person. I guess I’m blessed or whatever the hell you want to call it.” 

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May
21
7:00 PM19:00

School of Music's Spring Recital

Tuesday, May 21st
All Ages | 7pm | FREE

Open Chord Music will be holding its Spring Student Recital on Tuesday, May 21st, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. Doors will open at 5:00 p.m. for dinner and fellowship. The event is free and open to the public. Open Chord is located at 8502 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919.

The student recital will go until approximately 9:00 pm. Some students will perform with their instructors, some with fellow students, some with friends and family. The program will begin with acoustic performances, followed by group performances using amplified sound and a rhythm section (bass and drums).

All food and beverages (except alcohol) will be discounted 10% to bring attention to the fact that Open Chord routinely offers a 10% discount to all students and their families year-round. Both in the music venue and in the music store.

The roster at Open Chord School of Music has grown to more than 100 students. Weekly lessons are offered for guitar, bass, mandolin, ukulele, banjo, violin, and drums. Most of the instructors have over 10 years experience teaching in Knoxville and are well known in the local music scene.

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May
18
8:00 PM20:00

ETMS Presents: Covalence Album Release

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ETMS Presents: Covalence Album Release

Saturday, May 18 
All Ages | 8pm

Tickets $8 Advance, $10 Day of show

With Brack Owens supported by Mass Driver
The Worn Out Soles

Come help Covalence celebrate the release of its debut album, Alpha Decay, on Saturday, May 18 at the Open Chord. The band will be cranking out popular selections from their CD as well as crowd-favorite covers! The Worn Out Soles and Brack Owens featuring Mass Driver will also take the stage to blast out some high energy rock and serious metal that is sure to make the party an event not to be missed! 

Covalence is a four-piece alternative rock band that regularly explores the melodies and rhythms of the progressive metal and grunge genres. Co-founded in the autumn of 2016 by vocalist/lead guitarist Carter Manson and rhythm guitarist Tad Long, the band also features bassist Gabe Carrasco, and drummer Richard David Hodges. 

While Manson's meticulous guitar playing and sometimes gritty, full-throated/other times tamer, smoother vocalizations define and exemplify what Manson refers to as the "hard/gentle blend" of the band's primary sound, Long's intuitive accompaniment and subtle variations add a depth and range uncommon to many bands of Covalence's ilk. Underscored by the understated yet powerful thrum of Carrasco's bass and the thunderous precision of Hodges' drums, Covalence harmonizes its myriad of talents into galvanic, crowd-pleasing concerts that have resulted in growing recognition and burgeoning respect in the Knoxville music scene.

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May
17
8:00 PM20:00

Corbette Jackson

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Corbette Jackson

Friday May 17th
All Ages | 8pm
$10 ADV
$12 DOS

The experiences we face throughout our lives, in many cases, can determine who we become. They not only shape our character, they guide us to our destiny. This is the case for singer-songwriter Corbette Jackson. His life journey consists of a series of events that collided to form the reason he creates fearlessly and the way he embraces and performs music. Corbette Jackson grew up in Newnan, GA with the same interests as any typical small town American kid. However, he was exposed to indigence and an environment rocked by domestic violence at a young age, putting both him and his mother’s safety in jeopardy. In efforts to escape an abusive household, Corbette’s mother took him and his brother and moved to Puerto Rico to temporarily live with Corbette’s grandparents. Despite all of the chaos around him, Corbette found solace by putting on his headphones, walking around the countryside outside of San Juan embracing the music. In those moments, he became aware of his desire to create music that could help others hold on to a sense hope and his vocation to offer a live experience for everyone to be outside of themselves for a while.

Fast forward to Corbette Jackson’s teenage years where he put his destiny in motion by moving to Nashville after graduating from high school. His first musical endeavor was a fund-raising song for a hometown friend who was battling Stage 4 cancer. The release, “Heart of A Champion,” quickly became one of the most requested songs in the Atlanta area and demonstrated to the young singer how his music could connect to affect meaningful action. He went on the road to support the single and his high-octane shows became widely renowned throughout the live music circuit in the southeast. But the relentless touring took its toll.

After the Heart of a Champion Tour, Corbette felt compelled to take time to pursue other interests. He took classes while working in the emergency department of a trauma center at a Tennessee hospital. During his experience there he came face to face with the stark realities of life, which led to his ultimate decision to return to music. “Introspectively, it was a tumultuous time.” says Jackson. “I was trying to decide if music was the path that I wanted to take and what it was that I wanted out of life. Suddenly, I was working in a trauma center where people were fighting to survive under daily basis, where every moment was critical. It had a transformative effect on me, and it t was one of the vital parts of my life that provided me some of the impetus and accountability to live the life that I want and to get out there and do what I believe my creator ultimately put me here to do.”  

After finishing school and wrapping up his time at the hospital, Corbette decided to return to his true passion, creating and performing music. He wrote. He recorded. He started playing live shows again. He found his sound. Now that sound is starting to be heard all over America. Powered by a production team on opposite sides of the globe, in Nashville and in Tokyo, the Georgia native is redefining musical lines and genre boundaries.    

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May
16
8:00 PM20:00

Peter Bradley Adams

Peter Bradley Adams

Thursday, May 16th
All Ages | 8pm 
$15 ADVANCED
$20 Day of Show

No matter the form, when it comes to art, there are a number of different tacks to take. Some artists continually push their work across new horizons. Others stand a bit more still in order to continually refine the capturing of their vision. Singer/songwriter Peter Bradley Adams falls into the latter category of perfectionists chasing their own perfection. With A Face Like Mine, he may well have caught it.

There's a confidence, a completeness in the song cycle that listeners have gleaned throughout Adams' illustrious career, but A Face Like Mine, his sixth solo effort, brings it all into sharp focus. Adams' brand of Americana nestles his often delicate, always heartfelt voice in the warm embrace of gentle guitar, tasteful dobro, subtle banjo, supportive bass, and unhurried percussion. The result is a sonic scape that, in turn, wraps itself around the listener like a soft blanket on a cold day. With A Face Like Mine, Adams further refines the simple musical sophistication that has become his trademark.

Throughout the self-produced set, Adams tells tales of love and loss, homes and hearts. The territory he mines is a deliberate mix of fact and fantasy. “I feel like I'm, firstly, a storyteller,” he offers, “but it's inevitable that my own stuff gets in there deep. And it's funny how, sometimes, I don't realize it until the song is done.”

Regardless of the details, there's always a philosophical bent that is often more under than on the surface, firmly grounding Adams' songs even as they stretch outward. By his own admission, Adams is a seeker who spends considerable time wrestling with matters of faith, though he's the first to admit he doesn't have any real answers. “I honestly don't know what the hell I'm doing... nor do I have the language for any of this stuff,” he says with a laugh.

That seeker's heart is the tie that so often binds these songs together. Whether the search for place and purpose is of a spiritual or geographical nature, few writers capture the journey as thoughtfully as Adams. An Alabama native, Adams says he feels most comfortable in motion and doesn't have a strong sense of being Southern, even though his music is rooted in that world in so many ways. And though he sets various scenes with his lyrical imagery, Adams always leaves room for the listener to crawl inside his stories and make them their own.

A Face Like Mine's songs were composed all over the world, from Alabama to India, and they dig into topics are disparate as the desperation of addiction (“Lorraine”), the grappling of self-image (“Who Else Could I Be”), the vitriol of politics (“We Are”), and the genetics of suffering (“A Face Like Mine”). “We Are” and “Who Else Could I Be” were originally written for a dance piece that Gina Patterson choreographed for the San Angelo Civic Ballet. Even so, Adams made sure the songs could stand alone in their own world no matter what else was swirling around them — confidence and completeness in action.

As a work of musical art, A Face Like Mine fulfills the promise of Peter Bradley Adams. And rarely has an artist's standing still sounded so divine.

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May
10
8:00 PM20:00

Rob Ikes & Trey Hensley

Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley

Friday, May 10th
All Ages | 8pm

Based on a mutual love of bluegrass, country, blues, rock, western swing, jazz and other string band music of all kinds, the partnership of 15-time IBMA Dobro Player of the Year Rob Ickes (who also plays superlative lap steel guitar in the duo on occasion) and widely respected acoustic/electric guitarist and vocalist Trey Hensley continues to delight and astound audiences of traditional American music around the globe.

Since joining forces in 2015 and recording their first album on Compass Records, Before The Sun Goes Down (nominated for a GRAMMY® Award), the duo has been asked to perform all over the world. They released their second album on Compass in 2016, The Country Blues, which testified to the growing diversity and expansion of their collaborative talents and repertoire. Ickes and Hensley were also key players on Original, the recent highly-lauded Compass Records album by bluegrass giant Bobby Osborne. Their participation garnered a Recorded Event Of The Year Award at the 2017 IBMA Awards for Osborne’s version of “I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You” on the GRAMMY®-nominated album. Ickes and Hensley also were on the 2016 Recorded Event Of The Year IBMA Award winner, “Fireball,” featuring Special Consensus, in 2016. The duo is busy at work in the recording studio the fall of 2018 recording their third album (set for a spring 2019 release) with six-time GRAMMY® Award-winning producer and engineer, Brent Maher.

Ickes and Hensley have shared the stage as a duo with influential mandolin master David Grisman, Australia’s fleet finger picking guitarist Tommy Emmanuel, and legendary American blues, folk, and rock guitarist Jorma Kaukonen (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna), all admirers of the duo. Ickes’ fluid, lyrical, yet stinging style has graced the recordings and concerts of artists such as Earl Scruggs, Merle Haggard, Alison Krauss, The Cox Family, Tony Rice, Vince Gill, Alan Jackson, Toby Keith, Reba McEntire, and even David Lee Roth. Ickes was a founding member of the critically acclaimed bluegrass “super group” Blue Highway for 21 years. At just 11 years old, Hensley was invited by Marty Stuart to join Marty and Earl Scruggs on stage to perform at the Grand Ole Opry. Hensley has since played onstage or opened for Johnny Cash, Charlie Daniels, Steve Wariner, and Peter Frampton, among many others.

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May
7
8:00 PM20:00

WDVX presents Dead Horses w/ Benjamin Jaffe of HONEYHONEY

WDVX presents
Dead Horses

w/ Benjamin Jaffe of HONEYHONEY

Tuesday, May 7th
All Ages | 8pm
$10 General Admission
$15 Premier Reserve Seating
$30 Table for 2 
$60 Table for 4

**On Sale Friday 2/16 at noon**

At fifteen, Dead Horses frontwoman Sarah Vos’ world turned upside down. Raised in a strict, fundamentalist home, Vos lost everything when she and her family were expelled from the rural Wisconsin church where her father had long served as pastor. What happened next is the story of Dead Horses’ stunning new album, My Mother the Moon, a record full of trauma and triumph, despair and hope, pain and resilience.

Blending elements of traditional roots with contemporary indie folk, Dead Horses writes music that is both familiar and unexpected, unflinchingly honest in its portrayal of modern American life, yet optimistic in its unshakable faith in brighter days to come.

Described by NPR Music as "evocative, empathetic storytelling," My Mother the Moon earned a spot in No Depression's "Best Roots Music Albums of 2018" list, and Rolling Stone Country declared the Wisconsin-based duo an "Artist You Need to Know."

Years before he hit the road as one half of the Americana duo HONEYHONEY, Benjamin Jaffe kickstarted his career as a solo artist. He was a young Massachusetts native living in Los Angeles, rolling his sharp songwriting, multi-instrumental chops and vocals into songs that were honest and experimental. A decade later, he returns to that career with Oh, Wild Ocean of Love his first full-length release as a solo artist.

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May
4
8:00 PM20:00

The Fine Colombians - A Tribute to Steely Dan

The Fine Colombians: A Steely Dan Tribute 

Saturday, May 4th
All Ages | 8pm
$12 Advanced
$15 Day of Show

How long ago can we say it started? Lead singer/keymaster Dr. K and bass master Scott Robbins met as 10-year-olds in 5th grade together, and then started their first rock band at age 12, but really the talk of a Steely Dan tribute started between Robbins and guitarist Brian David Lee back 12 years ago. Robbins and Lee, along with nearly every other band member, have been setting the Knoxville, TN music scene on fire for decades. When Dr. K moved to Asheville, NC back in 2014, he and Robbins reunited after not seeing each other for 15 years, and played a few gigs together. Robbins mentioned the Steely Dan dream one night after a show of the State Street Rhythm Section, and Dr. K got excited enough about the idea that once he finished his doctorate in music in 2017--just for fun--he started making some arrangements of Dan tunes, with 3 horns and 2 backup singers in the mix. After churning out 3 or 4 of these, one day Robbins calls Dr. K out of the blue and asks him if he wants to make this Steely Dan dream a reality. Funny you should ask me that, Dr. K responds...


Only a few months later, 9 excellent musicians are assembled, reading charts and rehearsing like mad, and finally having their debut show at Scruffy City Hall in the heart of downtown Knoxville. Dr. K, Robbins, and Lee were joined by Scott Fugate on drums, Meredith Whitehead and Michele Williams on backing vocals, Mike Spirko on trumpet, Dave Eckman on alto saxophone and Robert Knapp on tenor saxophone. Over a hundred devoted fans came out on a snowy night in December 2017 to hear this band for the first time, and the excitement carried over to their next show at The Open Chord (also Knoxville) in April 2018. The 250-seat venue was sold out hours before opening, but crowds gathered in the parking lot to listen in spite of not being able to get in the door!


So obviously our little corner of Appalachia is filled with folks who love the music of Steely Dan as much as the 9 members of The Fine Colombians do. As we continue to take this dream on the road, we hope y’all will keep coming to hear us play, and tell your friends about us at every opportunity. The Fine Colombians will “make tonight a wonderful thing” anywhere they will have us!

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May
3
8:00 PM20:00

Sierra Hull

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Sierra Hull

Friday, May 3rd
All Ages | 8pm
$100 4 Premier Seats & Table
$50 2 Premier Seast & Table
$25 Premier Reserve Seats
$20 General Admission

Sierra Hull has been recognized from age 11 as a virtuoso mandolin-player, astonishing audiences and fellow-musicians alike. Now a seasoned touring musician nearing her mid-20s, Hull has delivered her most inspired, accomplished, and mature recorded work to date; no small feat. Weighted Mind is a landmark achievement, not just in Sierra Hull's career, but in the world of folk-pop, bluegrass, and acoustic music overall. With instrumentation comprised largely of mandolin, bass, and vocals, this is genre-transcending music at its best, with production by Béla Fleck and special harmony vocal guests Alison Krauss, Abigail Washburn, and Rhiannon Giddens adding to the luster. Hull speaks eloquently, in her challenging and sensitive originals, her heartfelt vocals, and once again breaks new ground on the mandolin. Béla Fleck special guests on banjo on two tracks and duo partner, Ethan Jodziewicz, not only anchors the record on bass, but introduces us to a major new instrumental voice.

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May
2
8:00 PM20:00

The Brother Brothers with Olivia Da Ponte

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The Brother Brothers

w/ Olivia Da Ponte

Thursday, May 2nd
All Ages | 8pm
$10 General Admission
$15 Premier Reserve Seating
$25 Premier Table for 2
$50 Premier Table for 4

The Brother Brothers carry the folk tradition for a new generation. Identical twins David and Adam Moss honor contemporary aches with the nostalgic tenderness of another time on their debut full-length album, SOME PEOPLE I KNOW, out October 19, 2018 on Compass Records. Their stunning songcraft blends masterfully gentle guitar, cello and five-string fiddle with the sublime sort of two-part harmonies only brothers can carry. Their palpably fraternal stage presence and wonderfully familiar heart have earned repute among a modern folk scene; The Brother Brothers have recently opened for Big Thief, Lake Street Dive, Shakey Graves and more.

The album's title, SOME PEOPLE I KNOW, refers to the personal nature of these songs. As David explains, “I think every song on the album is about a person or a character, and in a way, it’s a reflection of ourselves.” For example, “Mary Ann,” written by David, is an encouraging ode to a friend with depression. “Banjo Song,” written by Adam, conveys a conversation with someone who gives up playing an instrument after a hurtful breakup. Though he’s usually on fiddle, Adam plays banjo on the track; throughout the album, David plays guitar and cello.

Recorded at Mark Ettinger’s Lethe Lounge in New York City with producer Robin Macmillan and engineer Jefferson Hamer, The Brother Brothers capably capture a modern snapshot of their surroundings. Yet, SOME PEOPLE I KNOW retains a timeless feel – something that the brothers were aiming for.

“I just want people to listen to it once and want to listen to it again,” David says of the album. “And every time they listen to it, I want them to find something new and in some way relate it to themselves. Whether they're listening to it today or in 40 years, I hope it will make them feel just the same.”

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May
1
8:00 PM20:00

The Way Down Wanderers

The Way Down Wanderers

Wednesday, May 1st
All Ages | 8pm
$12 ADVANCED
$15 Day of Show

Often referred to by fans as one of the hardest-working, hardest-touring bands on the circuit today, the 5-piece Illinois-based act not only proves that classification with their jam-packed tour schedule but also on stage every night, with youthful exuberance and a lively stage show, as reliable as it is infectious. High energy percussion, mandolin, guitar, bass, banjo and fiddle weave seamlessly together to create an experience for fans that has sold out shows across the UK and the United States, filling the front rows with fans not just singing along to one tune, but singing along to all of them. “Everybody says it. We’d be nothing without our supporters. Yeah, they buy tickets and of course we love that, but when we’ve been on the road for 10 hours and walk onto a stage road weary and we see familiar faces singing along, it’s hard to describe. It's everything, really. There’s a whole lot of love there.”

Music enthusiasts are not the only ones taking note. Critics and tastemakers alike have awarded the young artists an impressive number of accolades ranging from official showcases at AmericanaFest (2018) and International Bluegrass Music Association (2016) to Whitstable UK Session of the Year (2017), a BBC Scotland Session (2017) as well as Finalist, International Song Writing Competition (2015 & 2016), Chicago’s Best Emerging Artist, Deli Magazine (2014) and Songpickr’s Best Songs Spotify Playlist (2016) among others. The young men are no strangers to the festival circuit either, having played major National and Regional Festivals such as Merlefest, Summer Camp, Red Wing Roots Music Festival and Saskatchewan Jazz Fest all across the United States, Canada and the UK. The band has also graced the stage of coveted venues such as Bluegrass Underground (TN), The Fox Theater (CO), Park West (IL), The Vogue (IN) The Station Inn (TN) The Ark (MI), and countless others

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Radney Foster
Apr
27
8:00 PM20:00

Radney Foster

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Radney Foster

w/ Zach Dubois

Saturday, April 27th
All Ages | 7pm Doors | 8pm Start
$20 ADVANCED
$25 Day of Show

“Radney Foster is one of the most talented singer/songwriters of our time. His voice is so unique, sexy and engaging.” – Sara Evans

Foster remains a top-notch tunesmith and stunning lyricist…echoes early, electric-era Bob Dylan…”.- Gordon Ely, Billboard

After 30 years in the music business, Radney Foster knows his way around the stage. Whether slinging electric guitar in front of his full band, or picking an intimate acoustic show, Foster has an uncanny knack to connect with an audience. With numerous number one hits to choose from, his shows are a perfect blend of new treasures and beloved classics.

2018 saw Foster expand his storytelling to short fiction, and his shows often incorporate passages from his book—enthralling listeners from the stage of the Grand Ole Opry to Gruene Hall. “You just gotta know when to read, and when to just shut up and sing,” laughs Foster.

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Apr
26
8:00 PM20:00

The Suitcase Junket

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The Suitcase Junket

Friday, April 26th
All Ages | 8pm
$15 Premier Reserved Seating
$10 General Admission

From the salvaged sounds of American juke joints, back porches, honky tonks, and rock clubs, The Suitcase Junket conjures an entirely new sound on his essential rock collection Pile Driver (out April 21, Signature Sounds Recordings).The Suitcase Junket is Matt Lorenz: artist, tinkerer, swamp yankee, one-man band. His is the road-worn voice rising over the grind of a tube-amped dumpster guitar, and the wild double pitches of throat singing. From Lorenz' penchant for thrift and ingenuity comes this full-length Signature Sounds debut of original rock anthems, mountain ballads, blues manifestos and dance-hall festivity. It is magnificent, rousing, image-driven songwriting, layed out on instruments built of broken bottles, thrift store forks, dried bones, gas cans, shoes, saw blades, a toy keyboard, salvaged instruments, and an overhead compartment’s worth of luggage.

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Apr
25
8:00 PM20:00

Knoxville Karaoke Competition

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Knoxville Poetry Slam presents

Knoxville Karaoke Competition

Thursday, April 25th
All Ages | 8pm | FREE

Have you always wanted to put your Karaoke skills to the test? Well now you can at the Knoxville Karaoke Competition!

You'll have one song, or five minutes to rock the stage with all your might. At the end, you'll be scored by five random judges from the audience on a scale of 1-10!
We'll have three rounds and will eliminate the lower scorers from round to round to eventually determine the champion. How are the performers scored? Staying on key? Energy? Stage Presence? Whatever the judge feels like makes a performance awesome! Show up early to register as there will be limited slots available. Hosted by the Knoxville Poetry Slam's Lane Shuler and Courageous.

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Apr
24
8:00 PM20:00

Open Mic Night

Open Mic Night

Wednesday, April 24th
All Ages | 7pm Sign-ups | 8pm Start

***SOLO PERFORMERS AND BANDS WELCOME***

***Sign up for a 2-song slot at 7pm!***

Are you tired of having band practice in your basement? This is the perfect chance to practice with your band on a REAL stage in front of a REAL audience! We'll supply everything you might need backline-wise. Just bring your instruments!

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Apr
23
8:00 PM20:00

Bar Church

The Point Church presents Bar Church!!

Tuesday, April 23rd
All Ages | 8pm | FREE

Bar Church is an opportunity to come as you are, text in your questions, and enjoy the casual, positive atmosphere of church in a bar.
On Tuesday, April 23rd, Open Chord is the place to be for cold beer, live music from The Point band, and some good, solid truth.

Easter Sunday followed by Bar Church Tuesday? Sign us up.
It's always a good time - so come join us and bring your friends!

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Apr
22
6:00 PM18:00

Guitar League ft. Roger Hay

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Guitar League Knoxville

Monday, April 22nd
All Ages | 6pm

Guitar League meeting welcomes Roger Hay as our headlining instructor. Be here at 6:00pm for Open Mic then our meeting begins at 6:40. At 7:30, the breakout sessions will begin. DON'T FORGET TO BRING A FRIEND AND YOUR GUITAR. First meeting is always free then just $75/year or $10/meeting.

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OC Record Swap
Apr
20
12:00 PM12:00

OC Record Swap

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OC Record Swap Meet

Saturday, April 20th
All Ages | 12-4pm | FREE

It’s the Open Chord Record Swap Meet! For one day only we are creating a space for all vinyl lovers to enjoy. Whether you are a full fledge vendor, casual seller, or buyer, the Open Chord Record Swap Meet has something for you! We decided not to take a vendor fee for any sellers, so ANYONE can come and buy/sell/trade! COME GETCHA VINYL ON!!!

Food and Drinks will be available at the café all day long!

Vendors: Load-in at 10am – MUST BRING THEIR OWN TABLE (NO BIGGER THAN 6ft)

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Apr
19
8:00 PM20:00

Unspoken Tradition

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Unspoken Tradition

Friday, April 19th
All Ages | 8pm 
$8 ADVANCED
$10 Day of Show

Unspoken Tradition plays passionate bluegrass. Drawing on their influences of the original bluegrass masters and the roots of traditional music, they perform with a hard-driving and sincere sound that features deep appalachian soul with their vocals and solid technical proficiency with their instruments. Their music and overall artistic vision reflect the ever-changing culture of Western and Central North Carolina-- where they call home.

Their debut recording, Simple Little Town (2013) saw quick success in radio; including XM’s Bluegrass Junction where the band’s music continues to be in solid rotation. Their follow-up release, Miles Between was featured on The World Cafe’s nationally syndicated programming and ranked #14 on WNCW FM’s top 100 releases of 2015.

That same year they played the main stage at the historic MerleFest festival and have quickly grown a fervent following in North Carolina and beyond. Touring both regionally and internationally the group has joined Balsam Range, The Boxcars, Peter Rowan, Jim Lauderdale, The Del McCoury Band, and many others on stage.

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Apr
18
8:00 PM20:00

The Unlikely Candidates w/ The Brevet

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The Strange Lines Tour ft.

The Unlikely Candidates
The Brevet

w/ Robinson Park

Thursday, April 18th
All Ages | 8pm 
$12 ADVANCED
$15 Day of Show

Based out of Fort Worth, Texas, The Unlikely Candidates are an indie rock band initially formed as an acoustic duo by childhood friends Kyle Morris and Cole Male in 2008. Eventually expanding the lineup to include guitarist Brenton Carney, bassist Jared Hornbeek, and drummer Kevin Goddard, the band was also able to expand its sound in bigger, more sweeping directions. In 2013, the band signed on with major-label Atlantic and released their debut EP, Follow My Feet. In early 2016, the Unlikely Candidates returned with a hooky new single in “You Love Could Start a War,” which made a strong showing on Billboard’s Alternative Songs chart.

One listen and it’s immediately clear that The Brevet have undergone a dramatic evolution on their explosive, ambitious new album, LEGS.Synthesizing the raucous energy of their live show with sonic precision of their extensive studio history, the collection is the California five-piece’s most deeply personal and lyrically sophisticated yet, tackling perception and identity in the digital age with both subtle nuance and blunt force. The songs remain as cinematic as ever, full of rousing choruses and sing-along hooks, but they carry more weight here, propelled inexorably forward by thunderous percussion and blazing electric guitars that blend rock and roll snarl with R&B swagger.

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Apr
17
8:00 PM20:00

Albert Cummings

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Albert Cummings

Wednesday April 17th
All Ages | 8pm | $20

Entertaining audiences from his phenomenal guitar work to his incredibly impassioned lyrics and overall songwriting prowess - one thing has certainly become clear about Albert Cummings’ music: He is FAR MORE than simply just the guitarist or the bluesman he’s often painted as by fans and the media alike. He offers the complete package.

Though undoubtedly a masterful guitar player who burst onto the blues rock scene in the early 2000’s and almost immediately began gaining praise in that realm, his latest release “Live at the ‘62 Center” further portrays not only his versatility as singer/songwriter and live performer but as an artist first and foremost.

This comes to fruition in the true spontaneity and creative spirit of the album, in which he put together a newly formed version of his usual trio that afternoon of the October, 2016 recording. With longtime friend and Grammy Winner Jim Gaines behind the soundboard, what comes through in both sight and sound is an incredible journey into the live performance world and true artistry of one of today’s most seasoned musicians.

His muscular guitar work is simply outstanding. He’s a great blues singer as well with passion for the tunes inherent in his full throttle approach.” - Rock and Blues Muse on Live at the ‘62 Center

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Charlie Hunter & Lucy Woodward
Apr
16
8:00 PM20:00

Charlie Hunter & Lucy Woodward

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Charlie Hunter and Lucy Woodward

Tuesday, April 16th
All Ages | 8pm
$15 General Admission
$20 Premier Reserved Seating
$40 Premier Table for 2
$80 Premier Table for 4

An exhilarating blast of blues, soul and funk, Music!Music!Music!marks the recorded debut of the musical partnership between guitarist Charlie Hunter and vocalist Lucy Woodward.

The duo first performed together in January 2018, when Woodward —fresh off supporting her fourth solo album, 2016’s Til They Bang on the Door—joined forces with Hunter as a last-minute fill-in on a tour he’d originally booked with Mexican singer-songwriter Silvana Estrada(whose visa application had been denied by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security). Bonded by their shared love of blues, Hunter and Woodward quickly constructed a setlist of favorite songs and hit the road. Within less than a week of playing shows together, they realized that they’d hit upon something very special, indeed.

Recorded in November 2018 at Stephen Lee Price’s studio in High Point, NC, with longtime Hunter collaborator Derrek Phillips on the drums, Music!Music!Music!features eleven radically reworked covers of songs by artists ranging from Blind Willie Johnson and Bessie Smith to Nina Simone and Terence Trent D’Arby.Soulful, spacious and deliciously in the pocket, Music!Music!Music!showcases the dazzling interplay between Hunter’s funky guitar and Woodward’s powerful voice, while also reflecting the spontaneity and good vibes of the duo’s live performances.

Hunter and Woodward will return to the road this spring to take Music!Music!Music!to the people. The tour for the album will stretch over much of 2019, with the duo going to Europe and Japan as well as all over North America


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Apr
13
8:00 PM20:00

Purple Masquerade - A Tribute to PRINCE

Purple Masquerade - A Tribute to Prince

Saturday, April 13th
All Ages | 8pm
$20 Advanced - Standing Room
$25 Day of Show - Standing Room
$50 VIP (Limited Number) - Seated

Purple Masquerade Is a High-Performance Celebration of the man, the myth that is Prince. They put on a high energy concert, performing Princes biggest hit songs. With elaborate costumes and incredible stage presence, they truly personify the Prince experience. The role of Prince is performed by the incredible El Cavitt. El was Prince's stunt double in the movie Graffitti Bridge, as well as a few of Prince's greatest videos. With choreography reminiscent of Prince, El delivers an explosive performance. By the end of the performance, the audience will be left in awe.

With a VIP Ticket, you will receive a signed poster, a custom Purple Masquerade at Open Chord T-Shirt, and you are allowed in the exclusive seated VIP section right next to the stage.

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Apr
12
8:00 PM20:00

Songwriters Showcase

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Songwriters Showcase ft.

Eli Fox
Roland Dixon
Haley Labelle
Olivia Da Ponte
Cameron Matthew Ray

Friday, April 12th
All Ages | 8pm 
$8 ADVANCE
$10 Day of Show

We are extremely excited to showcase some of Knoxville's best up-and-coming young songwriters. All 5 of these artists are incredibly talented songwriters with very diverse styles and approach to the craft. Fans of every genre will have something to love with this eclectic group of singers/songwriters/musicians.

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Apr
11
8:00 PM20:00

WDVX presents Lovers Leap

WDVX presents
Lovers Leap

Thursday April 11th
All Ages | 8pm | $10

Standing on the precipice of a new and exciting venture, the band members of Lovers Leap decided to jump. Under the shadow of the towering rock outcrop in Hot Springs, NC, from which their name was inspired, their sound took flight and soared through the mountain air. Their first encounter was set up by a festival producer as a musical blind date between GRAMMY-nominated bassist Shelby Means (formerly of Della Mae), acclaimed singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Mary Lucey (formerly Biscuit Burners), award winning guitarist and songwriter Joel Timmons (Sol Driven Train), and slide guitar pioneer Billy Cardine (Acoustic Syndicate and formerly Biscuit Burners). The quartet felt an immediate musical chemistry, which insisted on being pursued like a flirtatious lover. As their first show unfolded and boundaries dissolved, the satisfying balance of lush harmonies and provocative solos tugged on the audience’s heart strings while satiating their desires for instrumental virtuosity.

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Apr
10
8:00 PM20:00

Open Mic Night

Open Mic Night

Wednesday, April 10th
All Ages | 7pm Sign-ups | 8pm Start

***SOLO PERFORMERS AND BANDS WELCOME***

***Sign up for a 2-song slot at 7pm!***

Are you tired of having band practice in your basement? This is the perfect chance to practice with your band on a REAL stage in front of a REAL audience! We'll supply everything you might need backline-wise. Just bring your instruments!

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Apr
9
8:00 PM20:00

Knoxville Poetry Slam presents SPRING SLAM!

Knoxville Poetry Slam

Tuesday, April 9th
8pm | All Ages | $5

Knoxville Poetry Slam is a collective group dedicated to the love of words and a passion for poetry. Each month we gather to write, share, perform and even compete with our best work. Come join us and allow your thoughts to be provoked, your funny bone to be tickled and maybe even some tears jerked at the one and only Knoxville Poetry Slam and Open Mic!

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